Glenorchy and Skipper Canyon,New Zelland 

Glenorchy, a true slice of New Zealand paradise, sits a spectacular 45-minute drive northwest of Queenstown at the northern end of Lake Wakatipu.Surrounded by magnificent snow-capped mountains, pristine lakes and rivers, ancient beech forests and at the edge of Mount Aspiring and Fiordland national parks, the frontier town of Glenorchy has provided the backdrop for many films, including The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. There are a range of accommodation options as well as numerous activities that will get you out into the great outdoors for which this area is famous. There are also food and beverage options, a new camp ground and general store and a friendly community.

.The nearby settlements of Kinloch and Paradise are also known for their stunning scenery and tranquil setting. The area is also the gateway to several world-famous multi-day hikes including the Routeburn Track, one of New Zealand’s Great Walks. For walks closer to town, there are well-graded walkways that lead to points of interest including the Glenorchy Walkway, Whakaari Conservation Area and Mt Judah, where the remains of scheelite mines can be found.

Explore Glenorchy’s natural beauty
There are a number of exciting ways you can explore the beauty of this pristine area. Take the sites in by horseback and ride through braided rivers, native forests and across open fields. By water you can journey into the heart of glacier country with a jetboat, canoe or kayak. Take a stunning scenic flight into unexplored wilderness or experience the thrill of a skydive over landscapes that have remained untouched for centuries. Or grab a backpack and hiking boots and use Glenorchy as a base for one of the many spectacular walking tracks including the Routeburn, Greenstone and Caples Tracks. Anglers will find salmon in the local rivers, while hunters enjoy seeking out a wide variety of game in the surrounding hills. There are also farm tours available and off road four wheel driving and photo safaris. 


Skippers Road clings to the side of Skippers Canyon, which drops vertically to the Shotover River, once known as “the richest river in the world”. Rental car companies won’t allow their vehicles on this narrow, unsealed road, but there are plenty of local operators available to take you up the canyon. If you want to test your fitness, mountain biking is also an option.

The road was built during the gold rush, when a precarious pack track was the only access to Skippers township and the Upper Shotover diggings. Constructed between 1883 and 1890, the Skippers Road was considered a major engineering feat in its day. One three-kilometre stretch of the road involved hand drilling and blasting solid rock to create a platform 183 metres above the Shotover River. This daunting task required workers to hang on ropes high above the raging river. This section, aptly named Pinchers Bluff and the Devils Elbow, is a highlight of the road to Skippers.

Some people are lured up this precipitous road with adventure on their mind. There’s rafting on the Shotover River, jetboating with Skippers Canyon Jet and 4WD adventures to Skippers. Others want to discover the amazing Upper Shotover scenery – dramatic schist bluffs and rock tors stand like sculptures in the tussock landscape. The road commands views of the Richardson Mountains to the west and the Harris Mountains to the east

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Kommetjie

Kommetjie is a small town near Cape Town, in the Western Cape province of South Africa. It lies about halfway down the west coast of the Cape Peninsula, at the southern end of the long wide beach that runs northwards towards Chapman’s Peak and Noordhoek.The area is a popular spot for surfing, since powerful waves from the Atlantic Ocean rise up over rocky reefs formed by hard sandstones of the Table Mountain Group. Wherever the bottom is rocky, the shallower waters are thick with giant kelp forests.

Kommetjie is famous for its excellent crayfishing despite recent changes in fishing quotas which have seen a drastic reduction in the daily catch allowed.

Rotorway helicopters

In 1961, RotorWay’s founder, B.J. Schramm, tested the company’s first prototype, the Javelin. The Javelin used a 40 hp (30 kW) motorcycle engine, and was the forerunner of RotorWay’s first production helicopter, the Scorpion, which was offered in 1967.

The Scorpion, priced at $6,300 (not including the cost of the engine), was the first real kit helicopter on the market that flew. The Scorpion was intended for the sport-flying public, rather than the commercial market and this dictated the cost and weight of the aircraft. Originally, costs were intended to be under $10,000, but inflation changed that. The original Scorpion weighed between 1200 and 1300 pounds. It featured a standard gear reduction drive, a semi-articulated two-bladed rotor system, and a one-person capacity.

1970-1979 

An improved version of the Scorpion was introduced in 1971. Among the modifications in the new version were all-aluminum rotor blades, a 115 hp (86 kW) OMC 2-cycle engine (Evinrude Vulcan V-4 outboard motor) and a heavier drive system (shafts and bearings).

In 1971, the Scorpion II was introduced with an OMC 125 hp (93 kW), 2-cycle engine which provided enough power to fly two lightweight people, unlike previous versions.

In 1974, the company eliminated the 2-cycle engine and, unable to find a manufacturer to make their 4-cycle engine suitable for the helicopter, began production of their own engine. This engine, called the RotorWay RW133, was a 4-cycle engine that was able to provide a cruise speed of 80 mph (130 km/h) with a range of 120 miles (193 km) and a useful load of 420 pounds.

The RW 133 engine was installed in the Scorpion II, which was renamed the Scorpion 133. The Scorpion 133 had a list price of $13,500, a gross weight of 1,235 lb (560 kg), and a range of 130 nautical miles (79 nautical miles (146 km) with two people).

1980-1989 

In 1980, RotorWay introduced the RW145 engine, and the Exec helicopter. This was the first helicopter produced by RotorWay that strived to get away from the “kit helicopter” look. Unlike previous helicopters, the Exec did not have an exposed frame or exposed engine and far more attention was given to the aesthetics of the aircraft.

1982 marked the introduction of the asymmetrical rotor blade, enabling the craft to climb to higher altitudes and making the blade resistant to erosion, but with a risk of losing the aircraft if the engine quit.

The Exec helicopter was designed during the late 1980s, and had a 152 hp (113 kW) engine with a maximum payload of 400 pounds, cruise speed of 113 mph (182 km/h) and maximum airspeed of 130 mph (210 km/h). After selling just three Exec helicopters, the company succumbed to financial challenges and was purchased by a former customer, John Netherwood, and stopped production of the Exec helicopter due to design hurdles and financial constraints on the company.

The RW152 engine was manufactured in 1984.

1990-present 

In 1990 RotorWay Aircraft underwent reorganization and changed its name to RotorWay International.

The design and production of the Exec series helicopters began in the early 1990s, starting with the Exec 90. The Exec 90 contained the RI 162 engine, and, unlike previous helicopter kits, much of the assembly, including the welding, was done at the factory. The Exec 90 was followed by the Exec 162F in 1994.

The Exec 162F, with some improvements to the FADEC system and the ACIS, is still being produced and sold by RotorWay.

In July 2007, RotorWay announced the development of the A600 Talon. The A600 Talon features an updated FADEC system, an all-glass cockpit, a cog-belt replacing the primary drive chain, and a larger landing gear, among other features.

In February 2009, RotorWay purchased PMC Machining and Manufacturing, a Phoenix-based builder of helicopter parts. The CEO of PMC, Mark Porter, became president and COO of RotorWay as part of the acquisition.[4] The company also announced plans to certify a two-seat turbine helicopter using the Rolls-Royce RR300 engine and said that acquiring PMC will make that possible.

In July 2015 the company introduced the RotorWay RW7 model.

(Wikipedia)

Sport Helicopters – Waterfront Cape Town 

Sport Helicopters was founded by the late Mr Ernest Macdonald and his son Robert in 1990, and is today Sport Helicopters is owned and managed by Robert. Mr Macdonald, fondly known as “ELVIS”, pioneered scenic flights for tourists around the Cape Peninsula and Winelands during the mid 1980’s using single and multi engine aircraft.Sport Helicopters realized the need to provide a helicopter service to foreign visitors, tour operators and corporates, Mr Macdonald established Sport Helicopters at the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront with a single Bell Jetranger

Today Sport Helicopters owns and operates two 4 seat Bell Jetrangers, a 6 seat Bell Longranger, and an authentic ex Vietnam Huey Helicopter, located at the V&A Waterfront Cape Town

During the last 17 years, Sport Helicopters has become the preferred service provider to numerous 5 star Hotels, Inbound Tour Operators, Corporates and high profile individuals.

Sport Helicopters strives to remain the leading helicopter service provider through high standards of operations, maintenance and passenger satisfaction.