Jacek Proniewicz travel blog

picture and movies from my travel

Posts from the ‘paragliding’ category

Hobart windsurfing 

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Sport Helicopters – Waterfront Cape Town 

Sport Helicopters was founded by the late Mr Ernest Macdonald and his son Robert in 1990, and is today Sport Helicopters is owned and managed by Robert. Mr Macdonald, fondly known as “ELVIS”, pioneered scenic flights for tourists around the Cape Peninsula and Winelands during the mid 1980’s using single and multi engine aircraft.Sport Helicopters realized the need to provide a helicopter service to foreign visitors, tour operators and corporates, Mr Macdonald established Sport Helicopters at the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront with a single Bell Jetranger

Today Sport Helicopters owns and operates two 4 seat Bell Jetrangers, a 6 seat Bell Longranger, and an authentic ex Vietnam Huey Helicopter, located at the V&A Waterfront Cape Town

During the last 17 years, Sport Helicopters has become the preferred service provider to numerous 5 star Hotels, Inbound Tour Operators, Corporates and high profile individuals.

Sport Helicopters strives to remain the leading helicopter service provider through high standards of operations, maintenance and passenger satisfaction.

Table mountains ,Cape Town 

Table Mountain is South Africa’s best-known landmark, but what many don’t know is that it is also a hiker’s paradise with numerous trails, amazing views and plenty of interesting facts to learn. Oh, and it’s part of a national park. And all this in the heart of the Mother City.Table Mountain, probably the most photographed landmark in South Africa, is now one of the New7Wonders of Nature.

South Africa’s most famous landmark, Table Mountain, is more than just a pile of rock in the bay. A protected national park, it has some remarkable features that make it a great destination for nature-lovers, deserving of more than just a quick cable car ride to see the view from the top.

The mountain forms part of Table Mountain National Park, which is globally recognised for its biodiversity, and contains truly unique fauna and flora. The park encompasses the Table Mountain chain stretching from Signal Hill in the north to Cape Point in the south and the seas and coastline of the peninsula.

It is primarily an open-access park with only a few points where conservation fees are payable including Cape Point, Boulders (where you’ll see penguins), the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden and Silvermine.

The Table Mountain Aerial Cableway was the solution to the arduous walk and climb to the top. Since its opening in 1929, more than 22 million people have taken the trip to the top of Table Mountain. The new cableway was upgraded and officially reopened on 4 October 1997.

At the upper cable station you will find a restaurant and a curio shop as well as a network of footpaths to explore the table top.

There are plenty of hiking trails from the Camps Bay side of the mountain, as well as from the Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden, and even from the city centre itself.

You can walk or climb the mountain, or even abseil down it, depending on your expertise and fitness levels, but be warned. Although the mountain may look tame on any given day, each year it claims lives as people set off under-prepared for a sudden change in weather. Always hike in a group and carry water and warm clothing with you. Better still, hire a guide or ask an experienced hiker to take you along.

Visiting Gibraltar ,part one

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To arrive into Gibraltar is to be awestruck by the sheer majesty of the Jurassie limestone Rick that dominates the horizon .The Rock has attracted visitors ,some friends,some foe .Throughout its colorful history .All drawn its unique charm and character ,which still thrive today in the Gibraltarian people .

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Strategically situated on the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula ,the British Overseas Territory is almost entirely surrounded by water other then the narrow isthmus which links it to mainland Spain .
Gibraltar is less then seven square kilometers on the outside ,but inside lies a myriad of caves and tunnels that stretch for almost fifty kilometers .Herein lie some of Gibraltar ‘s biggest mystery and secrets .

To be continued

Cape Verde

Cape Verde is an Archipelago of nine islands lying like a jeweled necklace off the coast of West Africa

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Cape Verde’s beauty was largely kept a secret – the long beaches of endless white sand, lapped by turquoise ocean: the historical mystery of colonial style towns like Ribeira Grande, the first European City in the tropics: the wide variety of landscapes – from dramatic volcanic to lush and verdant. If you enjoy fine beaches, beautiful scenery, vibrant cultures and have a sense of adventure, Cape Verde will not disappoint.

The Cape Verde islands are a great destination all-year round for a getaway that refreshes your soul. You can expect temperatures from 24-27 degrees in the Spring/Summer season, and 22-25 degrees in the Autumn/Winter season.

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Aosta Valley and Courmayeur Ski Resorts

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The Aosta Valley is the smallest autonomous region in Italy but boasts many of Italy’s, and indeed the Alps, highest peaks. Throughout the valley there are over 800km of marked pistes and 150 ski lifts, mostly spread amongst the resorts of Courmayeur, La Thuile, Pila, Champlouc and Gressoney. Marked by Mont Blanc at the western end and stretching to the Monterosa in the east, the Aosta Valley is also home to the Italian flanks of the Alps most famous peak – the iconic Matterhorn and one of the valleys best known resorts – Cervinia.The resorts form the base of several distinct ski areas, La Thuile, Courmayeur Mont-Blanc, the Monterosa, Alagna in Piemonte, of course, Cervinia which now includes the entire Zermatt ski area linked at high altitude across the glacier. Although not all lift linked, one pass now buys you access to all these slopes, along with an extraordinary quantity, quality and variety of off-piste terrain.

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Courmayeur

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The historic mountain town of Courmayeur is one of the world’s top ski resorts. It sits on the Italian side of Mont Blanc, western Europe’s highest mountain, which it shares with Chamonix over on the French side. The scenery all around you here is spectacular, with fourteen 4,000m plus mountain peaks above and Courmayeur is a very atmospheric resort where ancient buildings huddle around cobbled streets so that the whole place oozes traditional charm.The resort offers skiing for all standards, including famous runs such as the resort’s World Cup Downhill and the International, a 6km (4 miles) run which drops 1,000m (approximately 3,300 feet) as it descends. Many runs are covered by snowmaking and the resort has a very good snow record.Serious skiers are likely to head for the more limited lift network of Mont Blanc, which serves steeper, more spectacular trail and links over to Chamonix which, along with Argentière further up the Chamonix Valley, is included on the Courmayeur lift pass.Beginners have wide open slopes to gain confidence on, with tuition from the Mont Blanc Ski School, founded in 1936 and one of Italy’s oldest and most prestigious. Intermediates are the most spoilt having both the wide open spaces and testing routes above Courmayeur and the ability to tackle the incredible runs that are unique to Mont Blanc.

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How the hot air balloons works

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Hot air balloons are an ingenious application of basic scientific principles. Here we will show exactly how the balloon works, what makes it rise and fall and how a pilot is able to maneuver it when it is in the air.

The basis of how the balloon works is that warmer air rises in cooler air. This is because hot air is lighter than cool air as it has less mass per unit of volume. Mass can be defined by the measure of how much matter something contains. The actual balloon (called an envelope) has to be so large as it takes such a large amount of heated air to lift it off the ground. For example, to lift 1000 pounds worth of weight you would need almost 65,000 cubic feet of heated air! To help keep the balloon in the air and rising, hot air needs to be propelled upwards into the envelope using the burner (see separate section on burners for more information.)

A hot air balloon is made up of 3 main parts:

The Envelope
The actual fabric balloon which holds the air

The Burner
The unit which propels the heat up inside the envelope

The Basket
Where the passengers and pilot stand

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The burner uses propane gas to heat up the air in the envelope to move the balloon off the ground and into the air. The pilot must keep firing the burner at regular intervals throughout the flight to ensure that the balloon continues to be stable. Naturally, the hot air will not escape from the hole at the very bottom of the envelope as firstly, hot air rises and secondly, the buoyancy keeps it moving up.

The controls for piloting a balloon are actually extremely simple….

1 – To move the balloon upwards – the pilot opens up the propane valve which lets the propane flow to the burner which in turn fires the flame up into the envelope. Works in much the same way as a gas grill, the more you open the valve, the bigger the flame to heat the air, the faster the balloon rises.

2 – To move the balloon downwards – the ‘Parachute Valve’ at the very top of the balloon is what is used to bring the balloon down towards the ground. It is essentially a circle of fabric cut out of the top of the envelope which is controlled by a long chord which runs down through the middle of the envelope to the basket. If the pilot wants to bring the balloon down he simply pulls on the chord which will open the valve, letting hot air escape, decreasing the inner air temperature. This cooling of air causes the balloon to slow its ascent.

So essentially this takes care of the up and down movement, so how does the balloon move from place to place? Again the answer is very simple, the pilot can maneuver horizontally by changing the vertical position of the balloon because the wind blows in different directions at different altitudes. If the pilot wants to move in a particular direction they simply ascend and descend to the appropriate level and ride with the wind.

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