Jacek Proniewicz travel blog

picture and movies from my travel

Posts from the ‘Wild’ category

Îlot Maître ,New Caledonia

Only 15 minutes by boat from Port Moselle or Anse Vata, the gorgeous little island of Îlot Maître makes for a great day trip. Get out there with L’escapade, which runs the resort on the island, with Coconut Taxi or by taxi boat from Anse Vata. There’s a beach and snack bar for day trippers, or talk with the resort about using its facilities.

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Shorncliffe Pier,Queensland Australia

Shorncliffe Pier is a historic pier in Shorncliffe, Queensland, Australia, situated near Saint Patrick’s College and lower Moora Park. The pier with its white faded timber railings, colonial street lamps spaced out along the stretch of pier, and resting shelter towards the end was a much visited attraction for families, residents and tourists to the area. Reaching 351.5 metres out into Bramble Bay it is the largest timber pier in Brisbane and one of the longest recreational piers in Australia. The renewed pier was reopened to the public in March 2016

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Brooklyn Ferry to Dangar Island 

Brooklyn Ferry Service is a small ferry company, operating fully restored heritage vessels that run from Brooklyn to Dangar Island and Little Wobby Beach. The service provides essential public transport for the water-access properties in this area.The ferry runs everyday to a timetable and links with trains arriving and departing from Hawkesbury River railway station.

Take a day-trip to Dangar Island and learn about this history of this unique location and the ferries themselves.

Hawkesbury River Marina 

Situated on the majestic Hawkesbury River, Brooklyn Marina is just 1 hour north of Sydney in Australia

This magnificent waterway is nestled among spectacular National Parks and is considered Sydney’s hidden paradise.

The marina provides berths and moorings with full facilities for all our customers.

Dangar Island

A unique island paradise on the Hawkesbury River near Brooklyn to the north of Sydney, Dangar Island is surrounded by sparkling water and views in all directions. With no private cars to disturb the ‘sounds of silence’, Dangar Island is a haven of peace and tranquillity and an ideal place for a holiday, a weekend away or even a day trip from Sydney. 

Life on Dangar Island is so different to that in Sydney, you’d never believe you were just an hour away by train from the big city. For starters, the wheelbarrow is the main method used to haul goods from the ferry which services the island throughout the day from the town of Brooklyn. The only mode of public transport, apart from walking, is the push bike, unless you own one of just a handful of golf buggies that escaped the ban on powered transport. The island has only one shop/cafe, and a bowling club for members/visitors which has a bar. 

Sydney from above with world famous seaplane De Havilland Beaver

The de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver is a single-engined, high-wing, propeller-driven, short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft developed and manufactured by aircraft company de Havilland Canada. It has been primarily operated as a bush plane and has been used for wide variety of utility roles, such as cargo and passenger hauling, aerial application (crop dusting and aerial topdressing), and civil aviation duties

Shortly after the end of the Second World War, de Havilland Canada made the decision to orientate itself towards civilian operators. Based upon feedback from pilots, the company decided that the envisioned aircraft should have excellent STOL performance, all-metal construction, and accommodate many features sought by the operators of bush planes. On 16 August 1947, the maiden flight of the aircraft, which had received the designation DHC-2 Beaver, took place. In April 1948, the first production aircraft was delivered to the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests.

In addition to its use in civilian operations, the Beaver has been widely adopted by armed forces as a utility aircraft. The United States Army purchased several hundred aircraft; nine DHC-2s are still in service with the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary (Civil Air Patrol) for search and rescue. A Royal New Zealand Air Force Beaver supported Sir Edmund Hillary’s expedition to the South Pole. By 1967, in excess of 1,600 Beavers had been constructed prior to the closure of the original assembly line.] Various aircraft have been remanufactured and upgraded. Additionally, various proposals have been mooted to return the Beaver to production.

The Beaver has become one of the more iconic aircraft to have been produced in Canada. Perhaps one of the more significant events involving the type occurred in 1958, when a Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) Beaver played a supporting role in Sir Edmund Hiliary’s famous Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition to the South Pole. Due to its success, the Royal Canadian Mint commemorated the aircraft on a special edition Canadian quarter in November 1999. In 1987, the Canadian Engineering Centennial Board named the DHC-2 one of the top ten Canadian engineering achievements of the 20th century. Large numbers continue to be operational into the 21st century, while the tooling and type certificate for the Beaver have been acquired by Viking Air who continue to produce replacement components and refurbish examples of the type.








THE HISTORY OF THE ROSE BAY FLYING BOATS

The date is 5th July, 1938. The place is Rose Bay, Sydney. An Empire Class flying boat rumbles and bobs towards its departure point and then turns slowly into the wind. As the engines roar, the plane gradually gathers speed before skimming across the sparkling, blue waters and starting its lazy climb into the sky. So begins the Golden Age of Australian Aviation.

      
      

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