Jacek Proniewicz travel blog

picture and movies from my travel

Posts tagged ‘beach’

Paliton Beach, Siquior Visayas

Considered by some to be the most beautiful beach on the island it is located just a 4 kms from San Juan close to Tambisan Port. The fine white sand and the view to Negros and Apo island make this small beach (approx. 150m long) a special location. Fishermen pull their boats out and you can find many that have found their final resting place there and make great photography subjects. At high tide you can lay in the small natural ‘pools’ that are characteristic of Paliton. To find the road to Paliton you need to look out for the small church in barangay Paliton and turn down the road towards the sea, the beach is located approximately 1.5km on the main road.

Cala Salada Beach

Surrounded by pine-forested hills, the sandy bed and turquoise waters of Cala Salada are among the most enticing on the island.   
  Surrounded by pine forested hills, the small, protected sandy cove of Cala Salada is a favourite for residents and private boat owners as no tourist ferries ever get here. The water is beautifully clear, shallow and perfect for swimming, and the sea bed mostly soft sand. This small beach gets very busy on summer weekends, with people often spread across the rocks (perfect for jumping from) which separate Cala Salada and neighbouring Cala Saladita.

On the rocky promontory to the right is a picturesque stone tower with paths leading over the top to the little fringe of sandy beach beyond (popular with naturists). To the left are boathouses built into the rock. Well trodden paths leading into the hills are popular for walks in this unspoiled area.  
  The Caves at Ses Fontanelles

These are famous for cave paintings dating back to the Bronze age. For the explorers amongst you, just before you reach the entrance to the bay, turn off to the right and drive up the camino (dirt track). You will have to park the car and continue on foot up the cliffs to the caves at Ses Fontanelles.
The walk is long, but the views from the cliffs are incredible. The caves are actually more of an overhang and are protected by iron bars, which means you unfortunately won’t see much of the cave paintings which date back to the Bronze age. However if you still have the energy, you can climb down the enormous stone steps to the sea, where you can bathe in complete privacy.   
    
    
    
   

Cala Bassa Beach

One of the most beautiful coves on the west coast with the famous Cala Bassa Beach Club, easily accessible by ferry from San Antonio. 

  

  A popular beach near San Antonio which draws tourists daily and locals on weekends, Cala Bassa Beach truly offers something for everyone. It is reachable by car, boat and bus, with a range of useful facilities and wooden walkways providing access for the disabled and prams, making it easily accessible to all ages.

Cala Bassa Beach is surrounded by a wooded area of ancient, gnarled Sabina trees, and boasts clear, turquoise waters and soft, pale golden sand. It’s a safe bathing spot for kids, but not exactly a ‘sleepy’ beach, as there is a range of watersports on offer for the adrenalin junkies – including jetskis.  
    
    
    
 

Sete,France:the perfect brake

Sète is the most fascinating small town on the French Mediterranean coast precisely because it doesn’t go out of its way to be charming. It doesn’t have the time. This is an attractive – but serious – port full of working people with stuff to ship out and turbot to sell.The site is wonderful. Sète encircles a lone hill, the Mont St-Clair, on the otherwise flat Languedoc coast. And it is all-but an island. There’s the sea out front, of course. Behind, though, is the Thau lagoon – a vast expanse of salt water, colonised by oyster- and mussel-beds. Between the two, a network of canals brings the scramble of port and fishing activity right into the town centre.

The canals both define the town and provide the current that energises the place. Many townsfolk have their own little boats to take them shopping. Anglers with apparently unlimited time on their hands line the banks and, come summer, the main Canal Royal is the theatre of Sète’s famous water-borne jousting. Sète is, in short, a swirl of a spot, with constant movement on land and canal.

It helps, of course, that Sète has the finest unsung beaches of the French Med – eight miles of them stretching along the spit of land separating the lagoon from the sea. An enormous scheme to tidy up access and the shore-side promenade is under way. But don’t wait. Go now to find the unfiltered boisterousness of the real Mediterranean. I wouldn’t have it any other way. 

    
   

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