Jacek Proniewicz travel blog

picture and movies from my travel

Posts tagged ‘Japan’

Demon Fireworks Of Noboribetsu

Located in Hokkaido, Noboribetsu is home of the famous Jigokudani or “Hell Valley,” a volcanic crater said to resemble hell on earth. But it’s just as scenic as it is hellish, and after you’ve enjoyed a hike during summer, the fiery devils appear at night for the Demon Fireworks of Noboribetsu.

With swirling steam wafting upwards to the heaves, one wouldn’t be surprised to find a few demons hiding in the rugged terrain or enjoying the naturally occurring hot springs and footbaths.

The fireworks displays are free to watch typically in June and July, and start at 8:30 p.m., with a run time of about 30 minutes. To get a seat on the raised viewing steps for the fireworks, arrive about 8 p.m. However, note that those wearing open-toed shoes will not be allowed in this section.

Otaru Hokaido

Otaru, a port city on Hokkaido (Japan’s northernmost island), lies northwest of Sapporo on Ishikari Bay. The city is known for glassworks, music boxes and sake distilleries. Nishin Goten (“herring mansion”), a former fish processing plant built in 1897, explores the industry’s key role in the city’s earlier years. Completed in 1923, the Otaru Canal is now lined with cafes and shops in converted old warehouses.

Naritasan Shinshoji Temple

Narita-san Shinsho-ji Temple (usually just called “Narita-san”) is a large, picturesque Buddhist temple complex in Narita City, Chiba Prefecture, just a few kilometers from Narita International Airport. Japanese religion, nature, art and community come together here, making for a memorable visit.

Narita-san is a very popular temple visited by millions of people every year, and is the second most visited shrine or temple in Japan after the Meiji Shrine in Tokyo.

My 4 years trip round the World ,part 11 YOKOHAMA

Yokohama is Japan’s second largest city with a population of over three million. Yokohama is located less than half an hour south of Tokyo by train, and is the capital of Kanagawa Prefecture.

Towards the end of the Edo Period (1603-1867), during which Japan maintained a policy of self-isolation, Yokohama’s port was one of the first to be opened to foreign trade in 1859. Consequently, Yokohama quickly grew from a small fishing village into one of Japan’s major cities.

Until today, Yokohama remains popular among expats, has one of the world’s largest chinatowns and preserves some former Western residences in the Yamate district.

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Next destination Hong – Kong

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