Jacek Proniewicz travel blog

picture and movies from my travel

Posts tagged ‘sailing’

MAGELLAN’S GALLEON MARINE MUSEUM

MAGELLAN’S GALLEON MARINETake your vacation to the next level and check out this unique museum at Subic. Magellan’s Galleon Marine is also known as Magellan’s Landing Maritime Museum. Visit the attraction and get taken to the past. It is one of the hidden wonders in Subic. But it is worth your visit. Take a look around and marvel at the beauty of the displayed materials.

You can take your family in here. The treasures displayed hold a historical value to them. Kids can learn from touring the place. It is not as famous or big as other attractions. But it is a unique museum that will take you to the past. These gems are also from different countries. Showing finds that can be from as far as the Ming Dynasty, these are truly gems of history. Coming from shrunken ships, they are retrieved and taken care of.

Visit the museum and bring your family or friends with you. You won’t have to pay any fee. It is a great find amongst the attractions in Subic. You can explore the place for free. Magellan’s Galleon Marine also has rooms that are artfully designed. You can stay at this accommodation. There’s even a souvenir shop and they offer services for activities and sports.

While you stay at the hotel, try some of their offered services and take a peek at the museum. You will be glad to have discovered the unique place. They also sell great souvenirs in their shop. Buy some to bring to your friends or keep them for yourself. Magellan’s Galleon Marine is owned by an Australian diver. Brian Homan is a treasure finder who wants to display the artistic and historical value of these treasures.

Discover the relics that are found from deep within the sea. Look at the treasures and marvel at their historical value.

Windsurfing hydrofoil

Hydrofoil windsurfing is not a new idea. Early adaptations used teak boom Windsurfer boards on foils in the late 70s, and many variations of the concept have been tried since then without gaining much appeal or commercial success. However, in the last couple of years, Windfoils have evolved significantly – such that they are now an easy plug-n-play set-up with current boards and rigs. The result is truly revolutionary and perhaps the coolest advancement in windsurfing performance in a very long time.

It takes very little wind to get foilborne – only 8 to 10 knots – and once up on the foil, the floating sensation is quite remarkable. It is very quiet, completely quiet once the board leaves the water. The foil trim control is fore and aft over the lenght of the board: lean back to rise up onto the foil, lean forward to then level out or ride lower. Watch your ride height though, as “foiling out” (lifting so high that the foil “cavitates” at the surface of the water) will lead to a loss of foil lift and quick drop of the board back onto the water.

The performance and efficiency is amazing. A 6.0m² sail can be used for windfoiling where an 8.0-8.5m² is typically needed for planing a standard light wind board. Once foiling, the speed, acceleration and upwind pointing angles that are possible easily compare to what can be achieved with Formula racing gear.

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Shorncliffe Pier,Queensland Australia

Shorncliffe Pier is a historic pier in Shorncliffe, Queensland, Australia, situated near Saint Patrick’s College and lower Moora Park. The pier with its white faded timber railings, colonial street lamps spaced out along the stretch of pier, and resting shelter towards the end was a much visited attraction for families, residents and tourists to the area. Reaching 351.5 metres out into Bramble Bay it is the largest timber pier in Brisbane and one of the longest recreational piers in Australia. The renewed pier was reopened to the public in March 2016

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Brooklyn Ferry to Dangar Island 

Brooklyn Ferry Service is a small ferry company, operating fully restored heritage vessels that run from Brooklyn to Dangar Island and Little Wobby Beach. The service provides essential public transport for the water-access properties in this area.The ferry runs everyday to a timetable and links with trains arriving and departing from Hawkesbury River railway station.

Take a day-trip to Dangar Island and learn about this history of this unique location and the ferries themselves.

My 4 years trip around the world ,part 12 .HONG-KONG first time

Hong-kong .
Situated on the southeast coast of China, Hong Kong’s strategic location on the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea has made it one of the world’s most thriving and cosmopolitan cities.
Hong Kong as we know it today was born when China’s Qing dynasty government was defeated in the First Opium War in 1842, when it ceded Hong Kong Island to Britain. Within 60 years, Kowloon, the New Territories and 235 Outlying Islands were also leased to Britain. However, the history of the more than 1100 square kilometres that Hong Kong now occupies predates the events of the Qing dynasty by more than a thousand years. And, as you explore the city’s colourful heritage, you’ll discover stories of powerful clans, marauding pirates and European traders.
From its earliest days as a British colony, Hong Kong served as a centre of international trade. In the turbulent years of the early 20th century, the city’s population was bolstered by refugees, mostly from China. The arrival of immigrants in large numbers helped launch a new role for Hong Kong as a major manufacturing hub. It also brought economically stimulating energy and industry to the city’s character. In recent decades, as the economy of Mainland China has undergone a process of opening up, Hong Kong has transformed yet again – this time into a service-based economy as well as an important gateway to the world’s largest market.
Under the principle of ‘One Country, Two Systems’, Hong Kong became a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China on 1 July 1997. This arrangement allows the city to enjoy a high degree of autonomy, including retaining its capitalist system, independent judiciary and rule of law, free trade and freedom of speech.
A look at the city’s history could give a strong impression that change is the only constant here. However, despite all its reinventions, Hong Kong’s spirit has never changed. In fact, the same energy and dynamism that turned a group of sleepy fishing villages into a crossroads of international trade is now taking Asia’s world city into the 21st century. Experience that spirit and Hong Kong’s story yourself by exploring the city’s rich culture and heritage.

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Next Singapore

Monaco

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20121214-183332.jpg Five years ago we start Pangaea expedition here in Monaco ,crossing all seas all oceans visiting all continents .all together more then 120.000 Nm.And yesterday officially with Prince Albert we finish our journey around the world .Time for little holiday now .

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Suez Canal ,second day

The day started at 5.00am for us. We were subjected to the usual Egyptian malaise, as our pilot only arrived forty minutes late. Although forty minutes was a good result in the context of typical Egyptian lethargy. The early morning temperature was 15 degrees, which is something we are are not all used to after having spent a long period in warmer climes. As soon as Pangaea had entered back into the canal, I was hoisted up to the top of the main mast. At 36 meters above deck you certainly see a lot more and the panoramic perspective of having land closely on either side of the boat is indeed a unique perspective. There was a continual haze above the water due to the temperature inversion, and in fact the rest of the crew on deck were comparatively speaking a lot colder than I was up there. There are some interesting photos which I hope will bring my viewers some perspective of the Suez Canal amongst the desert topography and the passing giant ships.
We arrived at 10.30am at Port Said, and once again this could be an extreme test of our patience as we are subject to a long wait at the hands of Egyptian authorities….Now we going to Italy with quick stopover in Greece .

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